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Aptly labelled “Tribute to French Art-de-Vivre”, the limited-edition design symbolises the core of the French institution of generous hosting and joyful fetes.

As per tradition, Moët & Chandon has unveiled its holiday-season bottle in time for the year-end celebrations and this year’s pays homage to the finesse of the French “art of living”.

Aptly labelled “Tribute to French Art-de-Vivre”, the limited-edition design symbolises the core of the French institution of generous hosting and joyful fetes with a journey through the legacy of the champagne house.

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Just as France is deeply rooted in its taste for refinement, special attention to detail and generous culture of hosting, so does the Maison’s heritage echo the same sophistication. This image of lavish, incorporeal patrimony is magnificently captured by the intricate gold markings of French landmarks and expressive symbols on the bottle design.

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At the centre of attention is the Orangerie, built in Epernay by Jean-Remy Moët in the early 1800s. Moët drew his inspiration from the iconic Versailles palace, which like the House, is synonymous with the art of elegant hosting – both welcoming distinguished guests to relish equally celebrated champagnes.

Beside its grandeur, the instantly recognisable Eiffel Tower represents the timelessness of French luxury. Designed for the Universal Exposition of 1889 as a monument to French craftsmanship, it marks a time when Moët & Chandon’s wines were served to the new world’s elites.

The signature symbol of the House, the champagne pyramid, is also portrayed as an emblem of the house’s unparalleled savoir-fete. Depicted in the form of stacked glasses overflowing with champagne, it frames the house’s custom of elevating celebrations all around the world with its brand of bubbly.

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Lastly, the symbol of the Arc de Triomphe, Napolean’s ‘gift’ to Paris in 1806, honours Moët’s relationship with the emperor. Back in the day, Moët frequently hosted Napolean at Epernay while the latter was on in his way to battle. This gave to rise to the flagship champagne of the House, Moët Impérial.

The Tribute to French Art-de-Vivre is sold in two different packaging: the bottle (without the box) and the box (with a regular Moët Imperial bottle inside). Available at selected retailers in 75cl.

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